The American Dream: Living And Working In The US

Say what you will about some of its ongoing struggles, but America is still the land of opportunity to a lot of people. It’s a country of countless possibilities and has attracted those looking for success since its inception. If you’re one of the people who dreams of taking their career to America, then there are a few steps you need to take before you make the move. After all, with culture shock and differences in etiquette, moving country is never quite as simple as it sounds.

 

The American Dream: Living And Working In The US

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Get everything in order

You need more than a will to get into the US, of course. You also need a way. In particular, you need a permit to work or live in the United States. If you’re married to a US citizen, you may not need to concern yourself with this point too much. Otherwise, there are different ways to get a work visa for the US. For instance, you can join in the Green Card Lottery, where 50,000 visas are given to randomly selected applicants. If you’re a skilled worker, however, you might have a chance to get in on the merit of the skills you can provide to the economy. You have an even better chance if you’re a skilled agricultural worker since there’s a great need for them in the US at the moment.

 

Make the move in your head

Being able to arrange your permits and sorting out the practicalities of the move are only one-half of the journey, of course. If you truly want to succeed, then you have to know what it is to work in America. Starting with the language. If you’re reading this, then you already know it, but can you speak it like a native speaker? Here are some great tips that will not only help you improve your English-speaking skills, but they also get you to immerse yourself in US culture. From US media, conversations with natives, and attention to the news, you can learn the norms and etiquette that can often trip up a new arrival. You don’t have to lose your original culture in any way, but you have to make room for US culture.

 

Find your niche and work on it

If you’re applying as a skilled worker or an agricultural worker, then this process is fairly simple. You might need to update your certification and training but otherwise, the transition will be smooth enough. If you end up in the US otherwise, then you might need to do a bit more work. If you have an industry in mind, then see if you need any further education or certification to give you a better chance of landing a job. Or if you want to pave your own way, then there are plenty of self-employment opportunities you can pursue if you have the relevant skills.

 

If you can find your way in and you’re willing to take on the culture, then it’s all about finding the opportunity that’s right for you. Good ideas rarely go unrewarded in America and there’s still plenty of need for skilled workers.

 

*This is a collaborative post.

 

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